My Wife Is a Gangster


My Wife Is a Gangster

My Wife Is a Gangster (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

My Wife is a Gangster

is a 2001 South Korean film directed by Cho Jin-gyu; it’s about a female gang boss who needs to get married to fulfill her dying sister’s wishes. A sequel, My Wife is a Gangster 2, was released in 2003, with a third (My Wife is a Gangster 3) released at the end of 2006.

Eun-jin was separated from her older sister Yu-jin when they were kids at an orphanage. While growing up, Eun-jin became a gangster and adopted the nickname “Mantis.” Upon discovering that Yu-jin had cancer, Eun-jin demanded that the doctors perform an operation; however, they refused. The dying Yu-jin wished that her sister would marry soon, so Eun-jin went on a blind date under the advice of her underling Romeo, who invited a stylist to design the appropriate makeup for Eun-jin. However, the date was a disaster and Romeo was sent to find someone else more suitable.

Later, while Eun-jin was smashing up a car in retaliation against two men, a man ran up to protect her, but was accidentally hit in the head by Eun-jin. The man, Kang Soo-il, was a simple but kind-hearted man. He seemed perfect for Eun-jin and he later married her. Yu-jin spoke to Eun-jin about her desire to have children and Eun-jin set out to get pregnant. She forced her husband into several occasions of sexual intercourse.

While Eun-jin was out for a meal with her group, she was approached by a man from a rival gang, the White Sharks. She stabbed him in the head, barely missing his eyes. Afterwards, there was a meeting between Eun-jin and the White Sharks and a showdown was arranged between Eun-jin and Nanman.

Eun-jin and Nanman fought fiercely. It seemed that Nanman had the upper hand after stabbing Eun-jin in the stomach. However, as he went to finish her off, she moved out the way and Nanman fell down a cliff. However, Nanman managed to climb back up and tries to strangle Eun-jin. Eun-jin found a way to escape and stomps on Nanman’s groin.

Soo-il eventually found out that Eun-jin was in fact a gangster, and wanted her to give it up. Eun-jin discovered she was pregnant and told Yu-jin. Later, Yu-jin then died of cancer in front of Eun-jin after telling Eun-jin that her baby needs a father.
Later, Romeo died in the arms of Sherry, after being stabbed by five street punks. His friend Andy mistakenly believed it was Nanman and the White sharks who killed Romeo and set out to take revenge on them.

Upon arriving at the White Sharks’ warehouse, Andy and the rest of his group discovered that they were heavily outnumbered. The pregnant Eun-jin went out to fight the gangsters, but suffered a miscarriage after suffering a vicious attack by Nanman. Eun-jin told Nanman to stop kicking her in the belly as she was pregnant. Nanman then revealed that he had become a eunuch after his earlier showdown with Eun-jin.

As Nanman was about to stab Eun-jin, her boss turns up and pleads to the White Shark to spare her life in exchange for some documents. Soo-il found out that Eun-jin was pregnant when she was in the hospital. He takes revenge on Nanman by dousing him with kerosene. As he was about to light it, Soo-il was restrained but the Nanman foolishly ignites himself, along with 64 other men, when attempting to light a cigarette. The film ends with Soo-il as the leader alongside Eun-jin, who is starting a showdown with another gang leader.

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The Count of Monte Cristo


The Count of Monte Cristo (2002 film)

The Count of Monte Cristo (2002 film) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Count of Monte Cristo (French: Le Comte de Monte-Cristo) is an adventure novel by French author Alexandre Dumas (père). It is one of the author’s most popular works, along with The Three Musketeers. He completed the work in 1844. Like many of his novels, it is expanded from plot outlines suggested by his collaborating ghostwriter Auguste Maquet.
The story takes place in France, Italy, islands in the Mediterranean, and in the Levant during the historical events of 1815–1838 (from just before the Hundred Days to the reign of Louis-Philippe of France).

The historical setting is a fundamental element of the book. An adventure story primarily concerned with themes of hope, justice, vengeance, mercy and forgiveness, it focuses on a man who is wrongfully imprisoned, escapes from jail, acquires a fortune and sets about getting revenge on those responsible for his imprisonment. However, his plans have devastating consequences for the innocent as well as the guilty.
The book is considered a literary classic today. According to Luc Sante, “The Count of Monte Cristo has become a fixture of Western civilization’s literature, as inescapable and immediately identifiable as Mickey Mouse, Noah’s flood, and the story of Little Red Riding Hood.”

Background to the plot

Dumas wrote that the idea of revenge in The Count of Monte Cristo came from a story in a book compiled by Jacques Peuchet, a French police archivist, published in 1838 after the death of the author. Dumas included this essay in one of the editions from 1846. Peuchet told of a shoemaker, Pierre Picaud, living in Nîmes in 1807, who was engaged to marry a rich woman when three jealous friends falsely accused him of being a spy for England. Picaud was placed under a form of house arrest, in the Fenestrelle Fort where he served as a servant to a rich Italian cleric.

When the man died, he left his fortune to Picaud whom he had begun to treat as a son. Picaud then spent years plotting his revenge on the three men who were responsible for his misfortune. He stabbed the first with a dagger on which were printed the words, “Number One”, and then he poisoned the second. The third man’s son he lured into crime and his daughter into prostitution, finally stabbing the man himself. This third man, named Loupian, had married Picaud’s fiancée while Picaud was under arrest.

In another of the “True Stories” Peuchet describes a poisoning in a family. This story, also quoted in the Pleiade edition, has obviously served as model for the chapter of the murders inside the Villefort family. The introduction to the Pleiade edition mentions other sources from real life: the Abbé Faria existed and died in 1819 after a life with much resemblance to that of the Faria in the novel. As for Dantès, his fate is quite different from his model in Peuchet’s book, since the latter is murdered by the “Caderousse” of the plot. But Dantès has “alter egos” in two other Dumas works; in “Pauline” from 1838, and more significantly in “Georges” from 1843, where a young man with black ancestry is preparing a revenge against white people who had humiliated him.